Monday, September 30, 2013

Sept. 30 Tip: Attend Gandhi's Birthday (Oct 2) Interfaith Celebration of Peacemakers

Attend Gandhi's Birthday (Oct 2) Interfaith Celebration of Peacemakers

(The September 30 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)


Please mark Gandhi’s birthday by joining us for

Pilgrimage to Peace
An Interfaith Celebration of Peacemakers

6 pm, Wednesday, October 2, 2013

In the Chapel at
The Presbyterian Church (USA) Headquarters
100 Witherspoon in Downtown Louisville

Co-sponsored by Interfaith Paths to Interfaith Paths to PeaceAnd
The Office of Theology and Worship,
Presbyterian Mission Agency,
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

THE CELEBRATION WILL INCLUDE

• An opportunity to light a candle for a peacemaker you revere

• The Native American ritual of the four directions

• Chanting for Peace by a Tibetan Buddhist monk

• Words about Gandhi and “Truth Power”

• by a member of the Hindu Temple

• Peaceful words from the Qur’an

• Peace music in Hebrew

• A Reflection by Rev. Gradye Parsons, Stated Clerk of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (USA)

• Harp music, songs, prayers and more

And please gather with us after the celebration for
delicious refreshments courtesy of
Taj Palace Restaurant


https://www.facebook.com/events/557822094266794/

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Sept 29 Tip: Enjoy 'Playing for Change' performing "What a Wonderful World"

Enjoy 'Playing for Change' performing "What a Wonderful World"

(The September 29 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddLd0QRf7Vg&app=desktop

Playing For Change is proud to present a new video of the song "What A Wonderful World" featuring Grandpa Elliott with children's choirs across the globe. In these hard times children and music bring us hope for a better future. Today we celebrate life and change the world one heart and one song at a time!!

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Sept 28 Tip: Read about the danger of nuclear disaster in the book "Command and Control"

Read about the danger of nuclear disaster in the new book "Command and Control"

(The September 28 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace

http://m.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2013/09/30/130930crbo_books_menand

On January 25, 1995, at 9:28 a.m.Moscow time, an aide handed a briefcase to Boris Yeltsin, the President of Russia. A small light near the handle was on, and inside was a screen displaying information indicating that a missile had been launched four minutes earlier from somewhere in the vicinity of the Norwegian Sea, and that it appeared to be headed toward Moscow. Below the screen was a row of buttons. This was the Russian “nuclear football.” By pressing the buttons, Yeltsin could launch an immediate nuclear strike against targets around the world. Russian nuclear missiles, submarines, and bombers were on full alert. Yeltsin had forty-seven hundred nuclear warheads ready to go...


Friday, September 27, 2013

Sept. 27 Tip: See Parker Palmer and Carrie Newcomer discuss he song "Betty's Diner" (which she also performs)

See Parker Palmer and Carrie Newcomer discuss he song, "Betty's Diner" (which she also performs)

(The September 27 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://vimeo.com/35024589

Parker J. Palmer talks with Carrie Newcomer about her song, Betty’s Diner, and how it illustrates the second habit of the heart Parker writes about in "Healing the Heart of Democracy." Where does the spirit of goodness move through our lives? Maybe it’s in the daily and unexpected places. How can we draw out each others' stories? Visit with the folks in Betty’s Diner as Carrie sings them to life.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Sept. 26 Tip: TONIGHT!: Hear local spiritual leader Al Shands discuss his new book

TONIGHT: Hear local spiritual leader Al Shands discuss his new book

(The September 26 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Thursday, September 26th at 7 PM – Carmichael’s welcomes Alfred R. Shands for a discussion of his new book Rounding the Circle.  This inspiring collection of 65 essays, selected from over 400 by formerCourier-Journal Book and Opinion Page Editor Keith Runyon, offers a decade's worth of wisdom, observations and insights about faith, the arts, politics, current events and many other subjects, and reflects on the many challenges and wonders — both large and small, globally and in our own backyard — that the world offers.



Carmichael’s Bookstore – 2720 Frankfort Ave. – 896-6950


Sept 25 Tip: Listen to "Tattoos, Tradition and Grace"

From On Being: Listen to "Tattoos, Tradition and Grace"

(The September 25 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.onbeing.org/program/nadia-bolz-weber-on-seeing-the-underside-and-seeing-god-tattoos-tradition-and-grace/5896/audio

Nadia Bolz-Weber on Seeing the Underside and Seeing God: Tattoos, Tradition, and Grace

She’s the tattooed, Lutheran pastor of the House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, a church where a chocolate fountain, a blessing of the bicycles, and serious liturgy come together. She's a face of the Emerging Church — redefining what church is, with deep reverence for tradition.

Monday, September 23, 2013

The Sept 24 Tip: Violence and "Listening to the Voices in Our Heads"

From the NY Times: Violence and "Listening to the Voices in Our Heads"

(The September 24 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/20/opinion/luhrmann-the-violence-in-our-heads.html?_r=0

 THE specter of violence caused by mental illness keeps raising its head. The Newtown, Conn., school killer may have suffered from the tormenting voices characteristic of schizophrenia; it’s possible that he killed his mother after she was spooked by his strange behavior and tried to institutionalize him. We now know that Aaron Alexis, who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday, heard voices; many observers assume that he, too, struggled with schizophrenia.
To be clear: a vast majority of people with schizophrenia — a disease we popularly associate with violence — never commit violent acts. They are far more likely to be the victims of violence than perpetrators of it. But research shows us that the risk of violence from people with schizophrenia is real — significantly greater than it is in the broader population — and that the risk increases sharply when people have disturbing hallucinations and use street drugs. We also know that many people with schizophrenia hear voices only they can hear. Those voices feel real, spoken by an external, commanding authority. They are often mean and violent.
An unsettling question is whether the violent commands from these voices reflect our culture as much as they result from the disease process of the illness. In the past few years I have been working with some colleagues at the Schizophrenia Research Foundation in Chennai, India, to compare the voice-hearing experience of people with schizophrenia in the United States and India.
The two groups of patients have much in common. Neither particularly likes hearing voices. Both report hearing mean and sometimes violent commands. But in our sample of 20 comparable cases from each country, the voices heard by patients in Chennai are considerably less violent than those heard by patients in San Mateo, Calif.
Describing his own voices, an American matter-of-factly explained, “Usually it’s like torturing people to take their eyes out with a fork, or cut off someone’s head and drink the blood, that kind of stuff.” Other Americans spoke of “war,” as in, “They want to take me to war with them,” or their “suicide voice” asking, “Why don’t you end your life?”
In Chennai, the commanding voices often instructed people to do domestic chores — to cook, clean, eat, bathe, to “go to the kitchen, prepare food.” To be sure, some Chennai patients reported disgusting commands — in one case, a woman heard the god Hanuman insist that she drink out of a toilet bowl. But in Chennai, the horrible voices people reported seemed more focused on sex. Another woman said: “Male voice, very vulgar words, and raw. I would cry.”
These observations suggest that local culture may shape the way people with schizophrenia pay attention to the complex auditory phenomena generated by the disorder and so shift what the voices say and how they say it. Indeed, that is the premise of a new patient-driven movement, more active in Europe than in the United States, which argues that if you treat unsettling voices with dignity and respect, you can change them.
The Hearing Voices movement encourages people who hear distressing voices to identify them, to learn about them, and then to negotiate with them. It is an approach that flies in the face of much clinical practice in the United States, where psychiatrists tend to assume that treating such voices as meaningful encourages those who hear them to give them more authority and to follow their commands.
Yet while there is no judgment from the scientific jury at this point, there is evidence that at least some people find that when they use the Hearing Voices approach, their voices diminish, become kinder and sometimes disappear altogether — independent of any use of drugs.
This evidence is strengthened by a recent study in London that taught people with schizophrenia to create a computer-animated avatar for their voices and to converse with it. Patients chose a face for a digitally produced voice similar to the one they were hearing. They then practiced speaking to the avatar — they were encouraged to challenge it — and their therapist responded, using the avatar’s voice, in such a way that the avatar’s voice shifted from persecuting to supporting them.
All of the 16 patients who received a six-week trial of that therapy found that their hallucinations became less frequent, less intense and less disturbing. Most remarkably, three patients stopped hearing hallucinated voices altogether, even three months after the trial. One of those three patients had heard voices incessantly for the prior 16 years.
The more we know about the auditory hallucinations of schizophrenia, the more complex voice-hearing seems and the more heterogeneous the voice-hearing population becomes. Not everyone will benefit from the new approaches. Still, they offer hope for those struggling with a grim disease.
Meanwhile, it is a sobering thought that the greater violence in the voices of Americans with schizophrenia may have something to do with those of us without schizophrenia. I suspect that the root of the differences may be related to the greater sense of assault that people who hear voices feel in a social world where minds are so private and (for the most part) spirits do not speak.
We Americans live in a society in which, when people feel threatened, they think about guns. The same cultural patterns that make it difficult to get gun violence under control may also be responsible for making these terrible auditory commands that much harsher.

T. M. Luhrmann is a professor of anthropology at Stanford University and a contributing opinion writer.


Sunday, September 22, 2013

Sept 23 Tip: Learn about Thich Nhat Hanh and Mindful Movement

Learn about Thich Nhat Hanh and Mindful Movement

(The September 23 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.soundstrue.com/weeklywisdom/?source=podcast&p=8373&category=AGM&version=full

Most of the time, we are only barely conscious of our movements throughout the day. Mindful Movement practice, as Thich Nhat Hanh teaches, helps us reconnect with the deep joy and fulfillment that comes when we pay attention to the body. In this video clip, he shares one of the ten daily Mindful Movement practices practiced in Plum Village every day—a simple way to ground ourselves in presence and embodied awareness.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Sept. 22 Tip: Read America Magazine's Controversial Interview with Pope Francis

Read America Magazine's Controversial Interview with Pope Francis

(The September 22 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://americamagazine.org/pope-interview

The setting is simple, austere. The workspace occupied by the desk is small. I am impressed not only by the simplicity of the furniture, but also by the objects in the room. There are only a few. These include an icon of St. Francis, a statue of Our Lady of Luj├ín, patron saint of Argentina, a crucifix and a statue of St. Joseph sleeping. The spirituality of Jorge Mario Bergoglio is not made of “harmonized energies,” as he would call them, but of human faces: Christ, St. Francis, St. Joseph and Mary.
The pope speaks of his trip to Brazil. He considers it a true grace, that World Youth Day was for him a “mystery.” He says that he is not used to talking to so many people: “I can look at individual persons, one at a time, to come into contact in a personal way with the person I have before me. I am not used to the masses,” the pope remarks. He also speaks about the moment during the conclave when he began to realize that he might be elected pope. At lunch on Wednesday, March 13, he felt a deep and inexplicable inner peace and comfort come over him, he said, along with a great darkness. And those feelings accompanied him until his election later that day.

Sept 21 Tip: Learn about Sept 21 as International Day of Peace

Learn about Sept 21 as International Day of Peace

(The September 21 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.un.org/en/events/peaceday/

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.


Thursday, September 19, 2013

Sept. 20 Tip: Read about "Execution is still a random justice"

Listen to "Execution is still a random justice"

(The September 20 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://m.npr.org/programs/all/13/221451565

In the mid-1970s, Arkansas' electric chair was being used by the prison barber to cut hair, and the execution chamber in New Hampshire was being used to store vegetables. That's because in 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court shocked the nation by striking down Georgia's death penalty law, effectively ending executions in the United States. But the decision provoked a strong backlash among those who favored the death penalty, and within four years the high court reversed course and issued a set of rulings that would permit the resumption of executions.

Evan Mandery, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a former capital defense attorney, has written a new account of the tumultuous legal and political battles over the death penalty. Mandery is sympathetic to those who tried to outlaw capital punishment, but his account focuses on attorneys for both sides in the battle, as well as the views and deliberations of the justices who decided the cases. His book is called A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America.

He tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies about how the Supreme Court decisions of the '70s changed capital punishment.

Sept. 19 Tip: Join PeaceCasters This Sunday

Join PeaceCasters This Sunday
(The September 19 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

The PeaceCasters are Meeting this Sunday! 

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This Sunday, September 22
1:30 - 4:30 pm
Held at Central Presbyterian Church 
318 West Kentucky Street, Louisville

The new season of PeaceCasters meetings
continues this Sunday!
We will continue to work on developing our
Peer Mediation skills.

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Here the PeaceCasters are Playing the Cooperative Game
"King/Queen Frog".  Get Instructions for Playing this and Others
on the Peace Education Program Website
* * * * * * * * * * 

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Meeting every other Sunday, 1:30 -4:30 pm 
at Central Presbyterian Church 318 West Kentucky Street
(unless otherwise informed) 
 
September 22 
October 6 
October 20 
November 3 
November 17 
December 1 
December 15 
 
Our twice monthly PeaceCaster meetings teach conflict resolution and prejudice reduction while exploring creative expression through video making and expanding real life experience through team work and trainings.
It is for youth ages 12 to 16 who are interested in exploring their unique voices through video making and are ready and willing to interact in small and medium sized groups.
PeaceCasters regular activities include conducting interviews with local and visiting authors and leaders, documenting activities and events around Peace Education Program's 30th Anniversary, thematically appropriate field trips and trainings around the foundational skills of peace-making.
In addition, limited youth leadership roles are available for those seeking enhanced engagement with the program.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Sept 18 Tip: Psychologist: Some Domestic Abusers Want To Change — And Can

Psychologist: Some Domestic Abusers Want To Change — And Can

(The September 18 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2013/09/16/domestic-abuser-education

One in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. Psychologist David Adams has made it his life’s work to help abusers change their violent behavior.
In 1977, Adams and a group of friends founded Emerge, the first education program in the United States for perpetrators of domestic violence.
“What we had in common was that we were friends of women who had started the first battered women’s hotlines or shelters in the Boston area, and they had been getting calls in their hotlines from men asking for help for themselves, and the women who were working for these battered women’s programs did not feel it was their mission to really help the abuser,” Adams told Here & Now.
“We loved the idea — the whole idea of, why should the burden of change be on the victim, to disrupt her life and her children’s lives? Why shouldn’t we expect the person who is causing the problem to take responsibility?”So these 10 men, ranging from social workers to cab drivers, decided to take on the task and created a program to help the men who were willing to admit they had a problem abusing the women in their lives.
Some men who attend Emerge’s 40-week program are court-ordered to be there. However, “some of them are coming on their own accord and so, fortunately, I think it’s a good sign there’s a higher proportion of those men now too,” Adams said.

Sept 17 Tip: Friday evening: Join two of the world's most eloquent stewards of truth and compassion

Friday evening: Join two of the world's most eloquent stewards of truth and compassion

(The September 17 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Join two of the world’s most eloquent stewards on
PEACE through a commitment of Compassion.
“How Does Faith Strengthen Ones Capacity for Compassion & Restoration?”
A Symposium Format with Q & A
with The Author’s Corner for book-signing and meet & greet


September 20, 2013 @ 6:00 pm
The University Center Auditorium
824 So. 4th Street – Louisville, KY 40203

The daughter of Bishop Desmond Tutu, says, “It takes courage and the willingness to speak and hear the truth. The first step of healing is so often the hardest. We are afraid to speak our truth for fear of judgment and rejection. We are also afraid to hear truths that might question our images of ourselves”.
South Africa's Truth & Reconciliation Commission is a proven model for Hon. Naomi Tutu to present how we can begin to heal as individuals and a society.Rather than focus on what separates us”, she encourages us to “focus on our shared humanity in order to build a just world”.
        2 Screenings of the documentary:                “Long Night’s Journey Into Day”
        Eagan Learning Center Lectorium:     September 19, 2013 @ 3pm & 5pm

A Nobel Peace Prize nominee, has a heartfelt message of forgiveness, tolerance, and empowerment. “The suffering in this world is manmade, and each of us has the ability to speak out and challenge it”, states Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish.
Losing 3 daughters and a niece to violence, Dr. Abuelaish could easily have become a vengeful person. But he calls the destruction hate always brings, "a poison, a disease, a fire that eats the one who carries it." To honor and give meaning to his loss, Dr. Abuelaish established The Daughters for Life Foundation, which is dedicated to providing education, health, and leadership courses, so that other girls can live out the dreams of his daughters and their cousin.
         Suggested Reading:          “I SHALL NOT HATE:
                                                   A Gaza Doctor’s Journey on the Road to Peace”

For Reservations email:

Ambassador Shabazz: Ambassador@spalding.edu 
Jenna C. Williams: JWilliams17@spalding.edu

TICKETS:
$10 For General Admission       <>       Free for all students with I.D.



Sunday, September 15, 2013

Sept. 16 Tip: Attend Third Thursday lunch program: "Stop Ignoring the West End" - A Tale of Two Cities

Make Your Reservation for the Third Thursday lunch program: "Stop Ignoring the West End" - A Tale of Two Cities

(The September 16 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

To make your reservation email interfaithterry@gmail.com or call Cathy Ford at 458-1223

Stop Ignoring the West End" - A Tale of Two Cities

featuring Dan Crutcher, Publisher
Louisville Magazine

11:30 am to 1 pm, Thursday, Sept. 19

The Rudyard Kipling
422 W. Oak
lunch cost: $7

The March 2013 cover of Louisville Magazine challenges its readers to "Stop Ignoring the West End."  In nine articles spanning 36 pages, seven writers explore the barriers that divide our city, making Ninth Street a virtual "Berlin Wall" separating the West End from the rest of Louisville. Publisher Dan Crutcher writes, "we hope to encourage more discussion of what we as a city might do to improve the lives of those who live in west Louisville so that we can truly lay claim to being a 'world-class city.'"  
  
(Attendees will receive 
a free reprint of the articles)  

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Sept 15 Tip: Mark today's 50th anniversary of the 16th St. Baptist Church Bombing

Mark today's 50th anniversary of the 16th St. Baptist Church Bombing

(The September 15 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Street_Baptist_Church_bombing

The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.

On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.

Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a "few first-class funerals."

A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.
The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.

In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.

On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Sept 14 Tip: Take part in Sunday's Hunger Walk and feed lots of hungry people

Take part in Sunday's Hunger Walk and feed lots of hungry people

(The September 14 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://daretocare.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=502

PUT HUNGER ON THE RUN!

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Festival Plaza at Waterfront Park, Louisville, KY

You can register at the event from 12 noon to 2 pm.  Look for the registration tent with the red and white top near the north end of the Hunger Walk Festival.  See you there!


5K Run & Walk:  2:15 pm

  • Certified and timed 5K route for registered runners
  • Entertainment and music along the scenic waterfront route

Family Fun Festival: 12:00 noon to 4:30 pm

  • Stampede From Hunger Obstacle Course for Kids & Adults by The Stampede Series
  • Kids Zone by Kazoing - Inflatables, face painting, games, and more
  • Free Refreshments
  • Louisville's Finest Food Trucks
  • Information & Games

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Sept 13 Tip: Register for "Practical Tools for Transforming Your Life" from Spirituality U.

Register for "Practical Tools for Transforming Your Life" from Spirituality U.

(The September 13 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

to register email: interfaithterry@gmail.com

Practical Tools for Transforming Your Life
Led by John Shealy

7-8:30 pm, 3 Tuesdays beginning September 17 at Thomas Jefferson Unitarian Church

Tuition $75

This experiential program draws on the work of Ken Wilber who offers a comprehensive, holistic approach to personal development. Integral theory will be our framework for expanding our perspectives while discovering tools for shifting our level of functioning along many psychological, spiritual, interpersonal and physical lines of development. Mindfulness meditation will provide a container for resting into stillness and clarity - the foundation for deep personal and spiritual transformation. Please join us on this journey into our brighter future! For more information about course instructor John Shealy, visit  www.bemindful.org .

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

September 12 Tip: Sign up for Mindfulness Meditation Beginning Course at the Earth and Spirit Center

Sign up for Mindfulness Meditation Beginning Course at the Earth and Spirit Center

(The September 12 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Mindfulness Meditation Beginning Course

Can we train ourselves to be compassionate? A study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests that cultivating compassion and kindness through mindfulness meditation affects brain regions that can make a person more empathetic to other peoples' mental states.

Learn mindfulness meditation for your own personal growth!  Learn mindfulness meditation to assist your work as a health care professional or as an educator committed to teaching children from K-12.  Orientation to the ten week program on September 21st.  Classes on Wednesdays from 10-11:30 or 7-8:30pm at the Passionist Earth & Spirit Center, 1924 Newburg Road.  For more information or to register visit www.earthandspiritcenter.org.

Sept 11 Tip: Learn about the other 911: Gandhi's first nonviolent action Sept 11, 1906

Learn about the other 911: Gandhi's first nonviolent campaign began on Sept 11, 1906

(The September 11 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2012/09/the-other-911-anniversary-2465184.html

Since 9/11/2001, many people commemorate September 11 as a day that will live in infamy – a day of treachery, often cited disingenuously or duplicitously as pretense for a new era of war, violence and deprivation of civil liberties. 

But, paradoxically, few realize that – almost a century before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, DC – it was on a September 11 when Mahatma Gandhi launched his extraordinary “satyagraha” peace and justice movement through which Gandhi, and countless others inspired by him, have accomplished much good in the world by non-violently resisting and transforming widespread social injustice and oppression.

Monday, September 9, 2013

Sept.10 Tip: Join IPP's Hunger Walk Team (for Sunday's Walk) and help feed hungry people in Louisville and around the world

Join IPP's Hunger Walk Team (for Sunday's Walk) and help feed hungry people in Louisville and around the world

(The September 10 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Friends,

At 2:15 pm on Sunday, September 15, at Waterfront Park, join 2,000 other citizens from the Louisville area in feeding hundreds of thousands of people in the Metro area and around the world by taking part in the annual Dare to Care Food Bank Community HungerWalk.

Use this link to register NOW!

Be Sure to Use the Pop Down Menu and 
Select "Interfaith Paths to Peace" as Your Team

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Sept. 9 Tip: Dine Out tonight and Help Interfaith Paths to Peace!

Please Dine Out Tonight and Help Interfaith Paths to Peace!

(The September 9 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Take time to enjoy a delicious meal at Louisville's Best Restaurant (according to Metromix 2012) on Monday evening and help Interfaith Paths to Peace at the same time!

Dine at the Village Anchor ( 11507 Park Road in Anchorage) on Monday, Sept. 9 anytime between 5 and 10 pm and a portion of what you spend on supper will be donated back to Interfaith Paths to Peace!

Here's a link to the web site for the restaurant complete with menu!

Sept 8 Tip: Learn Self-Compassion, Step by Step with Dr. Kristin Neff

From "Sounds True" Learn Self-Compassion, Step by Step with Dr. Kristin Neff

(The September 8 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.soundstrue.com/weeklywisdom/?source=tami-simon&p=1763&category=PP&version=full

Most of us are very tough on ourselves. We feel a genuine desire to feel compassion for others, but we’re afraid that if we begin to feel that same compassion for ourselves that we’ll become self-centered, soft, or even stop thinking about others at all. But in this excerpt from the audio course Self-Compassion Step-By-Step, selected by Sounds True producer Randy Roark, Dr. Kristin Neff explains how self-compassion and self-criticism affect our minds and bodies, and explains why the quality of the compassion that we can give to others is often dependent upon giving ourselves the benefits of self-compassion first.

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Sept 7 Tip: Attend "Tattered Teddies" and Learn How to Prevent Suicide in Children 12 or Younger

Attend "Tattered Teddies" and Learn How to Prevent Suicide in Children 12 or Younger

(The September 7 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

Norton Healthcare and
The Louisville Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Present

Tattered Teddies

Call 629-1234, #2 to register for any of the five dates:
o        Monday, 9/9/2013
o        Tuesday, 9/10/2013
o        Wednesday, 9/11/2013
o        Thursday, 9/12/2013

o        Friday, 9/13/2013
Choose your time:
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
or
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Location:
*Monday & Tuesday
 Norton Healthcare Pavilion, 4th floor downtown, Interactive Conference Room
Wednesday - Friday: The Brook – DuPont
1405 Brown’s Lane

Suicidal behavior in children age 12 or younger is a subject of growing concern for those who work with children.  Suicidal thoughts and attempts in children have sometimes been overlooked, denied or ignored.

      “Tattered Teddies” speaker is Donna Bowyer, BA, who has been the branch director for the Canadian Mental Health Association for over 20 years.  Donna is certified by Livingworks, as a Master Trainer in Applied Suicide Interventions Skills Training (ASIST) and safeTALK (Suicide Alert for Everyone), as well as certified by the Center for Suicide Prevention as a trainer in Tattered Teddies.

      This workshop provides information and offers practical approaches for those working with children who are 12 years old or younger and who may be at risk of suicide.  Intervention approaches build on the skills taught in the Applied Suicide Intervention Training (ASIST) as it applies to children.

      “Tattered Teddies” Workshop is an interactive half-day workshop that includes group discussion, mini-lectures and case studies.


Thursday, September 5, 2013

Sept. 6 Tip: Starts tonight: "A Weekend with Harry Pickens



A WEEKEND WITH HARRY PICKENS
September 6-8, 2013

(The September 6 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace) 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH,  7:30 – 9:00 P.M., SANCTUARY

“Jazz for the Soul” – A solo piano concert of contemplative jazz


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th, 10:00 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.
“Sounding the Soul: Living as an Instrument of Grace” – A workshop focusing on principles for listening for God’s purposes for my life, illustrated by musical offerings. This workshop is open to the general public and members and friends of Second.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th, 8:30 and 10:50 A.M., CHAPEL AND SANCTUARY



The theme for both worship services will be “listening” and following the threads of grace that God is weaving through our lives. Proclamation will be in word, music, and other media
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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Sept. 5 Tip: Bar Mitzvahs Get New Look to Build Faith

Bar Mitzvahs Get New Look to Build Faith

(The September 5 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/04/us/bar-mitzvahs-get-new-look-to-build-faith.html?ref=us

Families have been treating this rite of passage not as an entry to Jewish life, but as a graduation ceremony: turn 13, read from the Torah, have a party and it’s over. Many leave synagogue until they have children of their own, and many never return at all — a cycle that Jewish leaders say has been undermining organized Judaism for generations.
As Jews celebrate the new year Wednesday night, leaders in the largest branch of Judaism, the Reform movement, are starting an initiative to stop the attrition by reinventing the entire bar and bat mitzvah process.
Thirteen Reform congregations across the nation have volunteered to pilot the change, and an additional 67 are on the runway. Everything is on the table: how or whether to teach Hebrew, whether to delay the ceremony until children are older, and even whether to require children to read from the Torah — now the centerpiece of most bar mitzvah ceremonies and the culmination of years of study. Parents will most likely be expected to play a larger role and emphasis will shift from prayer to social action.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Sept. 4 Tip: Diagnosing Self Destruction

From Science Friday: Diagnosing Self-Destruction

(The September 4 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.sciencefriday.com/segment/08/30/2013/diagnosing-self-destruction.html

Suicide kills twice as many people as murder each year in the United States, and rates in the military recently surpassed those among civilians. But while scientists have identified some risk factors for suicide—being white, being male, substance abuse, mental illness—they still have little idea what spurs people to take their own lives.

Monday, September 2, 2013

Sept. 3 Tip: Remembering the Spark That Ignited a Creative Fire

From the NY Times: Remembering the Spark That Ignited a Creative Fire

(The September 3 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://nyti.ms/1fsEybM

Readers from the worlds of television, classical music, dance, pop music, video games, art and theater share experiences that kindled their first creative and professional sparks.




Sept 2 Tip: Learn the History of Labor Day

Learn the History of Labor Day

(The September 2 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://www.dol.gov/laborday/history.htm

Labor Day: How it Came About; What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Sept 1 Tip: Read "101 Things I Learned in Architecture School"

Read "101 Things I Learned in Architecture School"

(The September 1 Compassionate Living Tip from Interfaith Paths to Peace)

http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/101-things-i-learned-architecture-school

“How to draw a line, the meaning of figure-ground theory, hand-lettering and the fact that windows look dark in the daytime—each item has resonance beyond architecture. Books like this are brief tutorials in the art of seeing, a skill useful in every aspect of life on the planet.” –Susan Salter Reynolds,latimes.com